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The Lost Kinjo - Disappearing Japanese Neighborhoods

Welcome to Lost Kinjo, a year-long project to uncover a little-known chapter of Japanese American community.

California once thrived with more than 40 different Japanese American neighborhoods or kinjo prior to WWII. They have all disappeared.

Over the next year, we will tell the stories of these Lost Kinjo or neighborhoods and discover why Japanese Americans left and where they went.

AsAmNews gained its inspiration from Preserving California Japantowns, a project by   Donna Graves and Jill Shiraki. The two worked tirelessly to identify the neighborhoods and to preserve its history.

This project is funded by the California State Library Japanese American Civil Liberties Program and the Takahashi Family Foundation.

 

Stories

State hearing Thursday on reclaiming Sacramento’s Japantown

By David Hosley A California State Assembly hearing may breathe new life to the lost Japantown in Sacramento and other communities cut off by freeways...

Photographer’s vision peels back layers of Placer’s Japantown

By David Hosley A photographer’s vision is peeling back the layers of four Japanese communities in Placer County, where an extraordinary community project presents Japanese...

Little Tokyo community protests gentrification as Suehiro Cafe closes

By Kiyomi Casey Protestors are demanding an end to the evictions of long-standing businesses in Los Angeles’s Little Tokyo.  On Jan. 16, community members gathered outside...

Japanese farmers in Cortez, CA formed co-op to protect land

By David Hosley Cortez Growers Association Celebrating 100th Birthday in 2024 (Editor note: Lost Kinjo is a year-long project funded by the state of California and...

Japanese Town Lives on in Walnut Grove, California

By David Hosley Unique Japanese American Architecture Preserved In Tiny Delta Town At midday on October 7, 1915, a fire started in downtown Walnut Grove.  Attempts...

Japantown in Oxnard, CA both blossomed & withered

(This is part of our continuing series, Lost Kinjo. It is funded by the California Civil Liberties Project of the California State Library &...

Japanese immigrants built Cressey. So why did they leave?

By David Hosley (This is part of a year-long AsAmNews series, Lost Kinjo (neighborhoods). We'll explore how 40 Japanese American neighborhoods disappeared in...

Lost Kinjo – The Lost Japantowns in California

By Raymond Douglas Chong The Project The California State Library’s Civil Liberties Public Education Program awarded a grant to AsAmNews for its Lost Kinjo (Lost Neighborhoods)...